Improved safety of police officers and community observed following rollout of body worn cameras

A reduction in allegations of assault and excessive use of force of officers have been noticed following the rollout of body worn cameras.

According to Police Minister Mark Ryan, a one-year pre-post comparison of the deployment of BWCs on the Gold Coast resulted in a 60 percent reduction in allegations of assault and excessive use of force; a 31 percent reduction in officer use of force; and a 39 percent reduction in complaint investigation time.

“These results show that Body Worn Cameras are having the effect that we knew they would – that is they are not only protecting our police from vexacious and unfounded complaints of excessive force, but they are giving the community an extra level of reassurance that their interactions with police can be reviewed when necessary,” said Minister Ryan.

“It is great to see that there has been a significant reduction in the time it takes to review these complaints as well.

“The Palaszczuk Government will always work hard to ensure the safety of not only our communities but also our frontline men and women.”

Commissioner Ian Stewart said the roll-out of BWCs was the largest of its kind in Australia.

“This is a massive project for the QPS, and is being monitored and coordinated by a dedicated team within the Organisational Capability Command,” said Commissioner Stewart.

“They address technical, training or procedural issues encountered by police using the technology.

“Of the 2,700 BWCs deployed across Queensland during the Stage One rollout, 95 percent of them are now in operational use. The Stage Two rollout of an additional 2,400 cameras commenced on August 1 and will be completed by December 2017.”

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